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requiring as a matter of law that north carolina coastal policy be based on historic rates of sea level rise rather than on what north carolina scientists actually preaddict. this means that even though north carolina scientists predict 39 inches of sea level rise within the century, north carolina by its own law is only allowed to prepare for eight. king canute would be so proud. further down, the south carolina department of natural resources wrote a report more than a year ago on the risks climate change poses to the palmetto state, but it was never released to the public. the state newspaper managed to obtain a copy of that study. the report calls for south carolina to prepare for increases in wildlife disease, loss of prime hunting habitat and the invasion of nonnative species, but to republicans, these are more problems which shall not be named. in south dakota, the republican legislature in 2010 even passed a nonbinding resolution calling for teaching in public schools that relies on a number of common and thoroughly debunked climate denier claims. in short, bringing climate denier pr
, no republicans voted for it. the bill includes a return to what used to be the law until 2004. the restriction on the sale of magazines that hold more than ten bullets at a time. that bill will now go to the full senate. and so far, no republicans have said they will support it. in debating it today, though, something kind of amazing happened in the senate and we have the tape of it. i want to show you the tape and what's going to happen here at the beginning is that you will see the republican senator from texas ted cruz, freshman senator giving a little lecture about what he thinks is important in this discussion. this lecture specifically to senator dianne feinstein, but bear with me. sit through the lecture for a second because what you're watching for here, what you want to see is the reaction to the lecture. watch. >> if i might pose a question to the senior senator from california. it seems to me that all of us should begin as our foundational document with the constitution. and the second amendment in the bill of rights provides that the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall
with iowa congressman steve king for reaction with that. a local new york state sheriff fears gun laws will give criminals an upper hand and explain why we're all at risk coming up. sometimes life can be well, a little uncomfortable. but when it's hard or hurts to go to the bathroom, there's dulcolax stool softener. dulcolax stool softener doesn't make you go, it just makes it easier to go. dulcolax stool softener. make yourself comfortable. hi victor! mom? i know you got to go in a minute but this is a real quick me, that's perfect for two! campbell's chunky beef with country vegetables, poured over rice! [ male announcer ] campbell's chunky soup. it fills you up right. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical stud
capabilities but altering maritime law enforcement to support its claims in the south and east tennessee's. it continues its informations dealing campaigns. russia will continue to resist putting more international pressure on syria or iran and display its sensitivity to missile defense. latin america and caribbean contend with weak institutions and trafficking which pose a threat to the united states. roughly 20 million human beings are being traffic around the world. every country is a source or destination for human trafficking. in some, given the complexity of our global responsibilities, intelligence could abilities have never been more important. thank you for your attention. we are ready to address your questions. >> thank you very much, director and for the written comments as well. director mueller, in a quick question, i mentioned the 100 terrorist related arrests in united states since january of 2009. and the number of convictions since 2011 at over 400. has the fbi been impeded in its ability to conduct investigations or collect intelligence from terrorist suspects because o
. we need prosecutors in the system. they are important. they enforce the law. we need them to do it in a way that's fair. we need to figure out how to hold them accountable because a lot of their actions can and do produce in justices in the system. >> host: professor davis, is there power institutionalized in law, or is it just developed over the years? >> guest: it's interesting. the idea -- prosecutors, a system of public prosecution started right around the time of jacksonian democracy with a view that we wanted to vote for people and hold them accountable, the whole idea of democracy is that the people choose the individuals to perform the functions, and so when we start to get the public prosecution -- because in the past, there was private individuals who were able to bring charges against other individuals and they would pay for it. that didn't last long. we ended up with a public prosecution system and ended up with elected prosecutors for the state and local system so all of our states, except about four of them, have elected officials for their state and local prosecut
and liberal laws to voting rights. not to mention president obama already in a constitutional challenge to his choices to sit on the national labor relations board. they're taking its fight all the way to the supreme court after a d.c. appellate court invalidated the recess appointments made when the senate wasn't in recess. the senator has vowed to block the nomination. other stories we are bringing you tonight, wall street shrugging off a botched european union bailout of banks and an unprecedented tax on the deposits in cyprus, a tiny nation of 1.1 million people that will cost investors hundreds of billions of dollars in market capitalization. the dow jones industrial average down more than 100 points earlier but rebounded losing a modest 62 points. the s&p fell nine, the nasdaq down 11 and a half. the market off of the lows of the day. officials revising the imprudent and unreasonable plan to seize money from bank depositors to pay for the eu bailout. much damage has been done and some investors are so shaken, they will take their money out of the banks at their first opportunity, which i
. the consumer protection branch is responsible for civil and criminal enforcement of federal laws designed to protect the health, safety and welfare of the american people. the branch actively prosecute individual and companies have committed fraud, or violated other laws and acted to protect consumers. our first panel this morning is focused on lottery and romance scams. as will be discussed, lottery scams prey on elderly and other potentially vulnerable individuals. unfortunately, scams are increasingly prevalent, and devastating to its victim. romance scams involve fraudsters to contact people by phone or over the internet, create an emotional bond, and then use the strong emotional tie to convince their victim to send or wire money to them. the panel of experts that we've assembled today is uniquely qualified to discuss these types of frauds and scams and educate the public how do not fall prey to these type of scams. the panel includes law enforcement, federal prosecutors and government and nonprofit leaders are dedicated to protecting individuals and consumers from deceptive and frau
. >> thank you. and apply to the law today los angeles laws that have passed and sometimes it does practically change the design. sometimes there are differences in code that really make that change and it might be to the detriment of how we might see the design. i think it would be useful in your analysis to look at some of those projects and where the code has changed and how that can be impacted in the over all project design. i'm all fore this kind of 60 day window process because i don't particularly find our discussion as particularly robust until they come back for extension but it's worth having a hearing if we choose those projects to review drawings. i recognize the challenges that what they may not -- people might opt in the process without actually being quite building permit ready. that's the challenge we have when people come for a 3 year entitlement. what they may come for a 3 year extension may not manifest when they do build. that's something we should have a whole separate discussion if the issue of design and outcome is changed. it's truly the change when we have
such undercover videos have been the key to tough new anti-cruelty laws like this video which revealed the use of deceased cows for beef sold to consumers. >> this led to the largest meat recall in american history. >> and this one which exposed cruelty and unsanitary conditions at major pork producers. >> the only reason this has been of interest is because the footage is so shocking. the cruelty is so revolting, the sanitary conditions are so pauling. that's what has trigger this had response. >> reporter: but now all of that could be coming to an end. under pressure from the agriculture industry, at least five states now have laws making it a crime to go under cover on farm properties to record videos. and many other states are considering it. the law passed in utah last year has legislators called and amal rights groups terrorists and the enemy. >> vegetarian people trying to kill the animal industry. >> this is about a group of people that want to put us out of business. make no mistake about it. >> in iowa, the law passed just a few months after an abc news report which won a genesis awa
really act as a good communicator and facilitator in the program from a law enforcement background. and the grant we get through public works really allows us to run effectively. >> great, thank you. >> [speaker not understood]. let me come on over here. what's your question? >> okay. [speaker not understood]. i've gotten three years of knowledge [speaker not understood]. my question is this. how am i going to get the police department, how am i going to get city council -- they're partially on board, but some of our people in public works are here today. how can i convey to them that i'm not a nut -- everybody here thinks i'm a nut because [speaker not understood]. how did they really take this seriously and realize that graffiti is a crime and it requires money and it requires attention from the officials, not just from covering graffiti? is there an answer? can you give me some sort of -- what's a good direction? >> [speaker not understood]. >> [speaker not understood]. basically the task force, they'll put together and try to convince the citizens something is happening, then i
a leading role in a decision to challenge voter id laws in texas and south carolina that could restrict minority voting rights. >>> several protesters and postal workers gathered in front of the national postal forum in san francisco today. many are upset about the postal service letting go of jobs and even closing post offices. ktvu's brian flores is outside one of the historic post offices slated to close with both sides of the controversy. good afternoon brian. >> reporter: good afternoon, tori. many postal workers say they are upset because their livelihoods are in danger, not only their jobs or pay may be reduced but historical post offices may close. meantime postal officials have attended the conference to generate new business despite paying millions of dollars to attend. >> but it must say important. >> speaking in front of hundreds of postal vendors, postmaster general patrick donahoe is looking toward technology to lead the postal service in the future. >> we think there is still plenty of growth opportunities because it's the most direct
to pass laws and the supreme court can decide whether to throw them out or not. ?o you know what that statement is exactly the problem. [applause] that statement is reminiscent of nancy pelosi when she was asked what is the constitutional basis of obamacare and her answer was, are you serious? lot ofre a whole politicians, democrats and republicans, in washington who have not looked at the constitution in a long, long time. let me answer speaker pelosi. yes, we are serious. [cheers and applause] the second amendment provides for the rights of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. [cheers and applause] of shall not be infringed did they not understand? it does not just end with the second amendment. the first amendment is a big target in congress. foraside their love regulating campaign speech because it seems every campaign elected official hates when the people dare criticize. is st. patrick's day. my irish mother recently reminded me that it is more than thettle ironic that national party that was the first national party to nominate the first two major party
. the reason that was filed against him is because the law strictly cites that it has to be an elected official or a department head and bottom-line i was in the military for quite a few years and one of the things i learned is the co is responsible for everything that goes on under his or her command. one of the comments that mr. [inaudible] made were regarding sergeant goss. he talked about all the expertise he had, experience, so forth, but sergeant goss for all his expeer seize cannot answer a simple idr in compliance with the law. some people say i want to embarrass people with my remarks. if the order is embarrassing, it is members of the legal division that have embarrassed the chief, not me. the simple fact that the legal division can't seem to accept a public records request and answer it on a timely basis is unacceptable. and the chief is responsible to see that all of the officers, all of the staff under his command follow the law. in in this case he did not. you can say you're just being picky, but on a nine to one vote turns out i was right, it was not responded to properly
operates the national and state criminal and background check system. we have to enforece the laws that we have. even the momentary glance at the laws we have proves there are holes in our system that even with adequate enforcement would not keep guns out of the hands that seek to do us harm. i'm focused on the fact that those on the terror watch list do not raise a flag in the system. what are those on the terror watch list and not automatically denied a fire arm from licensed firearms dealer and should it person?s listing on the list be a factor in the denial of a firearm? >> the reason those on the terrorist watch list [indiscernible] one of the factors is listed in the statute. there is legislation being discussed in terms of what more can be done to expand these prohibitive factors or to expand it and other ways the use of nix to bar the sale of guns. >> so a person can be on the terror watch list and yet we have to pass legislation to ensure that a person on that list can't purchase a gun. >> that is my understanding. >> the president has indicated he plans to devote additional resou
detail. but essentially the public trust doctrine exist in common law and a few other areas of state law. the port is really support to use these lands to promote meritime commerce and navigation, fisheries and the common law trust exist through a series of court cases, california court cases up through the california supreme court and california attorney general and the state land commissioner and we have the director of the state land commissioner, jennifer is here and i believe she'll participate in public comment. those three entities, the state lands commission and the attorney general's office and the california state system has common laws and rules for this state. there is rules in the california public resource code on how agencies like the court manage our property. one of the big rules is that we have to keep revenues from these land separate from the city's general revenues. where the state has handed over title to trust property to local agency like the city and county acting a the port there is a legislative trust grant. in our case in san francisco we have the burden act p
. they are important and enforceable law but we need them to do it in a way that is fair and we need to find out how to hold them accountable because a lot of their actions can and do produce in justices in the system. >> host: professor davis is the power institutionalized and tell all or just developed over the years? >> guest: the system of public prosecutions started right around the time of the democracy when we had this view that we wanted to vote for people and hold them accountable the people choose the individuals to perform these functions, and so when we start to get this prosecution because in the past there used to be practices, individuals, private individuals are able to bring charges against other individuals and they have to pay for it. that didn't last very long and then there was the prosecution system for the state and local system, so all of our states except for about four of them had elected officials for the state. federal prosecutors are appointed but state and local our elective officials and that ev process is supposed to be the way that we the people hold prosecutors acco
] >>> laws designed to combat voter fraud are popular with one particular demographic, the one that lost the white house in november. today, those forces are arguing before the supreme court that an arizona voter fraud law is so important its stringent documentation requirements so necessary that we should forget that federal law trumps state law. indeed. to understand, just how popular these laws are with conservatives, watch how the crowd at cpac responded to south carolina governor nikki haley when she mentioned her own state's voter fraud law. >> every election in our state now requires photo i.d. before you vote. >> joining us now is democratic congressman elijah cummings of maryland. welcome, sir. >> it's good to be with you. >> what is your response, sir, to hearing the crowds cheer like that for voter i.d. laws? because that line about voter fraud got a bigger response even than her line trashing the affordable care act. >> first of all, martin, i believe that voting is a right. and it's something that is afforded to all of our citizens and we should not be doing anything to prev
to hear those words. this is not to give the law- enforcement a short shrift. i have had an impact on my husband's life, some of the unwanted. but he has had an impact on mind. i have done extensive work with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must have a seat at the table. no. 2. community-based organizati
the state passes jessica's law. and bill, why are you afraid to confront new york governor andrew cuomo on jessica's law? >> a number of hard hitting reports on the governor. we now believe that like governor christie in new jersey he will sign jessica's law if it gets to his desk and we're working on that. not easy in new york. new jersey we did it and now we're coming here. william, liverpool, england. bill, this year i did not drink on st. patrick's day instead donated 50 pounds to charity. well, a tip of the hot to you, william. thanks for taking my tip of the day. bill from california i was disgusted by jesse watters showing teenagers inebriated at st. patrick's day. and arc gnaw, brit hume looked hot last night in his sweater. so let me get this straight, kay, you are saying that mr. hume looked hot, as in smoking? that's got to make his week. i don't think he ever heard that before. and finally tonight the factor tip of the day, had to read a lot of fiction because so much real stuff to digest, i have more homework than most kids. and it's a very exciting book, much better
. those agencies, those agencies that put out their regulations are required by law to explain to the american people whether it's worth it or not. they havele to certify how many hours it's going to take the american people to comply with all their new regulations. 81 year, mr. speaker, million hours. 1 million hours just last year were added to the federal regulatory code book in new work for men and women across this country. why is that low? the federal government is borrowing money to spend here. there is no prospect for tax relief on the horizon. taxes keep going up. brand new health care bill in place that folks don't understand. going to destroy their health care system, not to mention add to their cost of their business. and the federal government last year in the midst of this terrible recession, the midst of this difficult economy, added $33.9 billion in additional costs through regulatory activity that's going to take 81 million hours to complete. let's do some back of the envelope math, mr. speaker. 81 million hours. the average work year, 40 hours a week, you wor
prepared for. this being more than anything illustrates what this health law illegal unholy alliance between government and insurance companies because they are going to get about 4/5 of that money. >> we should have seen it coming. it's met to pay for insurance companies that have to cover those preexisting conditions. the thought was the insurance companies would pick that up or there would be surtaxes but it's the companies that provide those insurance plans to their workers that are paying this fee and putting this money into this pool. if you are a business and you are looking at trying to keep your balance sheet even, now you have this charge of close to $70 a worker, something tells me you are either got to cut back to workers or cut back to the planned increase you are planning for those workers. >> we've already seen some companies, especially if they have low wage earners that work hourly they are cutting back on the hours the workers can work. they are switching them from full time status to part time status, this is the way some of the employers are trying to avoid the ma
vote. supporters say law would keep illegal immigrants from casting ballots. the critics claim the real goal here is to keep minorities away from the polls. today the justices heard arguments from both sides. and the new york city mayor michael bloomberg is not backing down after the judge struck down his ban on large sugary sodas. in fact, the mayor has already outlawed smoking in bars and restaurants and now he he is going after tobacco again. how this time? you'll see for a while. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's
is a highly regarded securities lawyer, a professor at the university of san diego law school, and an expert on sarbanes-oxley. >> the idea was to have a criminal statute in place that would make ceos and cfos think twice, think three times, before they signed their names attesting to the accuracy of financial statements or the viability of internal controls. >> and this law has not been used at all in the financial crisis? >> it hasn't been used to go after wall street. it hasn't been used for these kinds of cases at all. >> why not? >> i don't know. i don't have a good answer to that question. i hope that it will be used. i think there clearly are instances where ceos and cfos signed financial statements that said there were adequate controls, and there weren't adequate controls. but i can't explain why it hasn't been used yet. >> we told partnoy about eileen foster's allegations of widespread mortgage fraud at countrywide and efforts to prevent the information from reaching her, the federal government, and the board of directors--in violation of the company's internal controls. i mean, th
of immigrants. we are built that way. our law calls for allowing immigrants to come who are able to sustain themselves and not the a public charge. we have instances now of the promotion of the program in foreign consulates. i think that is unnecessary. we promote the snap program in foreign embassies. >> i oppose this amendment strongly. outreach efforts are important. the senator made excellent points during the debate on this. this could lead to qualified individuals going hungry in a time people in our history are experiencing real poverty. i oppose the amendment. do you want a roll-call vote on this amendment? [roll call] the amendment is not agreed to. committee members are moving to the final vote. unanimous consent i want to make. before that, i want to thank all of the members of the committee. we have a very spirited and respectful debate today. showed us the path forward that we feel strongly about this country and are willing to work from our different perspectives to reach the common goal by not going from crisis to crisis. we are hoping to continue to move this forward next we
've done it, but couldn't do it here, old laws, 1988 robert bourke supreme court decision they went through his video cassette rental list and published it in the newspaper and it was called bourke's law and you couldn't publish information about the video rentals. netflix couldn't share information on networks because of the 19 the 88 law. if i want to share a tv show that i'm watching and my friends can he see it, it's a huge boon for netflix, likely to jump on line and watching the shows as a result of me watching it. charles: thank you for coming up and updating on technology and old law. and a man of the people took the bus to work, lived on his own and cooked for himself. does that mean he's against capitalism as some have been suggesting? that's at the top of the hour. now, however, i do have your seven early movers, let's start with coca-cola. they've got an upgrade from credit agrical. and vmware, this was big and they made some pretty popular suggestions. and j.c. penney, unupgraded the stock. btg upgraded it. lost 135,000 shares, they're nibbling. and needham says this stock is a
by challenging president obama and his health care reform law at the national prayer breakfast earlier this year. dr. carson not mincing words today, accusing washington of being out of touch with the american people. >> that's very sad that we have reached a point in our lives where so many people who feel that they're not represented anymore and this is something i want you people who are in congress and who are in the senate and who are in the white house to understand. you work for the people. you represent the people. >> harris: texas senator ted cruz firing up the crowd with his keynote address just a short time ago. his message defend liberty, the constitution and confront the nation's spending crisis head on. >> do we surrender or do we stand up now? on drones, do we surrender or do we stand up now? on spending, do we surrender or do we stand up now? on debt, do we surrender or do we stand up now? >> harris: molly henneberg live with the news at cpac. it got pretty loud as cruz was speaking. >> yes, there was a sense during this convenient that there t may be time for new voices, differe
right now especially is make sure that we follow our immigration laws, and we do not have immigration reform. we have enforcement. if we don't, and these people stay in our country, we are going to have a continuing administration like we have right now because they will always vote democratic. host: donna from iowa is next on the line for republicans. caller: i heard this he packed people, and i thought it was a great conference. the one thing i missed to all of addressedat no one the death test, where your doctor will have to make a decision whether they're going to continue to serve you as a patient or you get denied care. i wish someone had addressed this. other than that, i thought the conference was wonderful. host: william is on the line for independents. i have a question. host: go ahead. .aller: my statement is this i love the channel. 7.watch c-span 247/ i liked the conference because , they'reers there talking about principles and values, things of life we got to hear in this united states. here's the thing. they want to create jobs, right ? they want to put everybody back
, it was a law professor and a community organizer. and i think he was probably a liberal from the jump. and ted cruise comes out of a different political atmosphere. texas is very different from chicago he has the experience and the background of a guy who made it from scratch in the state of texas, which is -- you know low tax opportunity state. and you see the effect it's had on these two men, not that they wouldn't have those convictions anyway you can see it. >> bill: the nation is going to have to decide i think in the next four years what kind of country they want. because this is not going to be able to compromised. it's too big. brit hume, everybody, living large down there in miami. if you need any help, brit, call us tonight and we will help you out. directly ahead, a grizzly murder in colorado. will the woman beat the rap? there she is. big beef tonight. those reports after these messages. what's droid-smart ? with google now, it automatically knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by moto
where this evidence is the most useful. we have a standard in criminal law called the reasonable person standard. this fictitious person that we measure everybody's conduct by. we say this is the person, the average person, the average juror, the average individual, the kind of conduct that we would expect an average member of society to live up to. well, as it turns out that none of us are quite average, right. and we might actually be much more like people who we share particular brain structures with or people who we share particular environmental and brain similarities to. so we might need to start thinking about more particularized notions of conduct based on what we would expect of a person who has that type of brain structure who had these types of environmental factors and then start to think about how we want to treat them. do we want to hold those people responsible for their actions or less responsible for their actions. are there certain people who would be better subject to medical treatment instead of incarceration. are there certainly people who we actually think would be
and law enforcement can work together on measures that will ensure that certain operators are being a bit more responsible because that creates an issue for everyone else and i think that is where i hope that we go. >> anything else? and by the way, i think who knew that three harvard law grads would be so interested in this issue. i think that is president chiu noted that. >> is there any, anything else that chief? >> no, i think that complete agreement here. we all want to see the city prosper, and the clubs do well, and do the safely and responsibly. >> i think that we are working towards that goal and working closely with the entertainment in doing it. >> why don't we open it up to public comment. any member who would like to speak, please come forward. >> hello, i am stephanie grain berg and i am here representing the cpab as well as the neighbors which is a neighborhood association (inaudible) ininclusive of the troubled long troubled broad way corridor. first of all, thank you for having this hearing, i think that it is very, very important. i am here really to request or plead, if
records laws public library were both involved in serving a democratic right to know and empowering the people. that was before the library and san francisco government decided that serving the interests of the so-called aeries toe contracts could be turned into a private income stream. ~ you have become so enslaved to private money you decided right to know is a place to save money. if we want a democracy, we need open institutions of knowledge that allow access to the truth. saving money on those institutions of knowledge is like selling our children. it is no accident that the san francisco public library is the most egregious sunshine violator in the city. once it is a private income stream, the philanthropyists want power and exclusivityity. the destruction of democracy is what they expect for the money and if corporate influence can destroy the public library, they can destroy what you care about next. the destruction of truth is the destruction of democracy itself, having me arrested did you not solve society's problems and of course the lies cost i city money. thank you. ~ c
. under the president's health care law. if a small business has 49 employees, they don't pay any penalty. if they have 50 or more they are going to pay a penalty if they don't provide -- >> for your sacrifices you made for our country. i am so grateful that you are here today for this important hearing. i'm also incredibly grateful that many of you came this morning and participated in listening to the first two panels. that means a great deal, not just to our witnesses but also to their families and to all of our military families. we appreciate it very, very much. i know that this has become a very debated issue, both within the military and in everyday conversation. i also know that many of you have seen the film "the invisible war" as sort of a jumping off point on how important this issue is for our military and their families. i'm very, very eager to hear your testimony and each of you will have five minutes to give an oral statement and we can submit for the record any additional material you want to submit today and after your testimony. we're going to hear from robert taylor, th
further request a hearing of you today. we do need to talk about what is the law of the day. this is something that would be articulated in the stimulus possess in the clarification policy that we talked b the principles of the law of the day that a building application must conform to the law of the time of the approval. this is applying regardless of any provisions or what proifthsz provision were or were not in effect. what this means to take for example a project that hypotheticallily received your conditional use for the plan process but that didn't secure a building permit until after the plan's effective date, that building permit will be nonetheless be subject to all current provisions of that plan which can be parking control, use control. it does reflect long stand is advice from the city attorneys office and will apply going forward regardless of either of these two policies. here is our last slide commissioners and before you continue your discussion today we want to remind you on the mechanics of the policies of a single majority of commissioners is required in
husband john quincy adams and the complex relationship with her mother-in-law, abigail adams. we will include your questions and comments by facebook and twitter tonight. >> the republican party released a plan this morning for its approach to the next presidential election that deals with attracting minority and women voters. announced this. these comments are just under one hour. >> i appreciate that introduction. thank you for the introduction of in welcoming us to the press club. i know most of you came for eggs and coffee but thank you for staying for the speech. i want to recognize our co- chair sharon day and are treasurer tony day. day. our treasurer tony all, i you and most of want to think and how grateful i am to this opportunity project. their work cut brings us here today. i want to introduce them this morning. henry barbara of mississippi, glenn mccall of south carolina, former whitew, and house press secretary ari fleischer. when republicans lost in november, it was a wake-up call. in response, i initiated the most public and most, free handson if post election rev
member should do. of course, we have regulations to vote, to discuss laws and permits. we have a budget to control and in that budget, you will see our mobility policy. you can have your own expenses on infrastructure work, for instance, but in brussels, we also have an important policy on financing groups, social groups who are working on the issue. and i believe we should never forget to work on equity because we have those big social differences within our town. this is just shortly a slide that shows you what already has been polled, that denmark and the netherlands, they are in fact far ahead of all of the other european countries and belgium is somewhere in-between making an effort but for sure also at this trip, i have been able to learn a lot from my european colleagues in denmark and in the netherlands. brussels is in the heart of europe and i think it's also has been a very good thing that there is european regulations, although at this moment, european regulations are mainly on achieving certain environmental standards. let's say pollution by co2 and particles. but that has h
with those individuals. we abide by the open records laws, and the sunshine laws and i think in san francisco we haven't talked to the city attorney about that or your counsel about that but the open records laws and sean -- sunshine laws protect them up to appointment so we're not in a situation where every transmission of information is available to the general public. if that is the case or that becomes the case then we change the strategy around a little bit so we can help to protect the identity of the candidates, not necessarily the backgrounds, but the identity of the candidates by still abiding by those laws. >>i think one of the strengths of your team is the tremendous community involvement and searches that you done. i find it interesting to the work you did in l.a. and many nonprofits. my hope is as our diverse communities expect topnotch transportation selection processes like this that we can involve them in as many of the aspects of the profile and the competencies that we can and i welcome a number of stakeholder groups and give you the recommendations as we sit do
through the ordinance language. not once does it mention pass through. these are laws which are currently on the books and we believe the process works in our significant meetings we've had with tenant communities and with the ram port, we know there are hardship applications available for disabled and senior citizens and people who can not afford a resident increase in this nature. i know they are one of five organizations that receive funding from san francisco to help people with this process. with a we would like to do and i would like to give credit to supervisors breed for the amendment in the ordinance that there is now amendment for community outreach. this is a broad base piece of legislation which is in a 30 year plan, but to put it in this ordinance is something we need to do with significant outreach to the community, to the existing city departments that are going to be plan checking this, but to really make sure that if someone can't afford to pay for this, there are avenues that someone can take and i'm happy to have you come up to discuss the detail hardship of this proces
. >> and at least in spring through june. >> so we will actually have to adopt the change of the bi laws and we can call the meetings every month. >> i would rather keep it special meetings for may, april and, may, i think that once we get through, this, through the budget, i think that meeting at 9:30 will be appropriate. >> i don't want to go through changing the by laws. >> okay. >> that would be my preference >> thank you so much. the staff, and thank you so much to board members and if there are no further announcements are discussions the meeting is adjourned. >> -- to track stolen phones to be used in the field for other investigative purposes. that is approximately 977 dollars. >> you have a memo from the captain in your packets regarding this do nation. ironically to track cell phone thefts. is there anything you'd like to add? commissioners, questions or concerns? and is there any public comment regarding this matter. >> [inaudible] for quite a few times starting when he was the secretary for the police commission. i have a great deal of respect for him. i believe his promotion was w
, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have powerful evidence that a non-course of system can accomplish that public safety health objective
the supreme court. that's right. the law that banned the silencing of african americans is finally coming before our nation's foremost silent african-american. [laughter] of course, before the voting rights act black people were regularly kept from voting with roadblocks like literacy tests, poll taxes, and "you must be this white to vote" signs. [laughter] now that law is being challenged in the supreme court by shelby county, alabama. they argue that the law is unfair, because it applies only to states with histories of racial discrimination: alabama, arizona, georgia, louisiana, mississippi, south carolina, texas, parts of carolina, texas, virginia, and alaska, which has a sad history of discriminating against its african american population brian. [laughter] good guy. [ laughter ] he's a good guy. [laughter] but there's one key reason to strike this act down, as shelby -- there's one reason to get rid of this law as shelby county lawyer bert rein explained to the court. >> the problem to which the voting rights act was addressed is solved. >> stephen: you heard it, folks: racism is so
to the classical and timeless ideas in our constitution. it's time for us to revive reagan's law for liberty to expand, government must shrink. we must have a message that is broad, our vision must be broad and that must be based on freedom. cenk: oh smaller government and freedom, i didn't see that coming. was there a single speech that did not mention ronald reagan? >> i would be hard-pressed to find one. that one reminded me of the old joe biden riff about giuliani where he said subject verb, 9/11, you're trying to build this event and the speech really as moving forward. their slogan had something about america's future, and you're doing nothing but hearkening back to the old idealogy of the conservative party and movement and talking about ronald reagan every other sentence. that's not very forward-looking. none of the speeches talked about the very real, pressing challenges we had medical reform with health care costs driving the economy into bad places and the fact that the voting public is going to look vastly different than the cpac attendees do. cenk: that's a great point. let's sh
control. >> arthel: the federal department of veterans affairs putting its foot down on a new york gun law that takes effect today. it requires mental health professionals to report patients they believe could hurt themselves or others. but critics say the new law will deter people from seeking help for psychological issues. senior correspondent eric shaun live with more. >> as you said, under the law the doctor believes a patient is a threat, that information would go to authorities. but now some are refusing to abide by this law and veterans groups are in the forefront. they worry the new law could have the opposite effect, making patients not seek out help out of intimidation or fear. gunnery sergeant jesse jane duff, with the concerned veterans for america, she says not enough doctors can take action and they should take action when dealing with possibly dangerous people. they should do that without sharing privileged information with government agencies. >> they recognize that this is a very, very serious issue to veterans. there are veterans that they want to come forward if they hav
people witnessed the crime and did not step in. ohio has a law that if you witness a crime you must report it. there are many more that need to be charged for this. >> michael: lou shapiro when you hear that, ohio does have this law. it's a felony not to report a crime. it's seldom invoked. i went to school with an honor system. if you saw someone cheat you're as culpable as the cheater. >> the general public is not always expected to know what is a crime and what is not a crime. when someone is faced with a question, did you see the person may say, i didn't see it that way or it didn't hit me that way that's why it's not typically invoked. >> michael: as a defense attorney now. let's say--i'm going to give a hypothetical. these two kids were convicted. you're representing one of the people who are under surveillance by these grand juries under possible indictment. what do you say to the grand jury? what do you have your clients say here? at this point this case has been adjudicated. >> i would advise my client to play it as close to the vest as possible. if he hold out long enough
politics and fun but as the president, his job, the law requires him, to submit a budget by the first monday in february. four of the first five years of his presidency he's failed and this is the first time since the law went into effect congress was forced to kick off the budget process because the white house -- >> the president's people would say it's -- they're hammering over the budget, sequestration. that's what prompted this. it's not all his fault. >> first of all he missed three of the previous four. >> neil: other presidents have missed. >> but his number of misses. >> neil: higher than theirs? >> if we're talking about shooting percentage, he's hitting 1-5. >> neil: what's in it for him being late? >> he sees what's in it for me or what do i suffer by not doing it on lets let the house do their plan. the senate will put out their plan which never balances. i'll say nice things and eventually put out my plan which isn't going to go anywhere but you can't ignore the law. if you're a conservative and sports fan you shouldn't be man that the president is having fun doing his b
. eight shotgun shells expand background checks the background check fee, and the laws will go into affect on july 1st. it happened in the state of colorado where today they woke up the department of corrections was asass fated. he's friend of governor john hickenlooper. john hickenlooper said he signed this ban on high capacity weapons because it's a sticking point on the gun control debate. >> i think this ban on high capacity magazines is of that same ilk. it allows us to con tim contemplate someone who is bent on destruction just the seconds that it allows others to escape. >> michael: coloradoans were able to do what the united states senate was unable to do. dianne feinstein's ban did not pass on the floor vote because harry reid decided they were not going it to put it in their gun bill that they're going to put on the floor. it's an assaults weapons ban. over 200 weapons are still available to americans. but no, this was not good enough. the reason was because reid and other democratic senators were afraid of how it would play. max baucus of montana jon tester of montana. mark begi
the governor of colorado signed an important gun safety bill into law, a series of bills into law. the new laws limit ammunition magazines and requires universal background checks to be paid for by gun customers themselves. they followed new york who just over a month ago became the state with the toughest gun laws in the country. outlawing magazines with more than seven rounds and gun safety is a national problem but the states are leading the way. none more than the state of new york. joining me now is the man who played the pivotal role in getting those laws passed, new york state attorney general eric schneiderman. mr. attorney general, welcome back to the show. you had a top law enforcement official in one of the biggest states in the country. tell us how you managed to get things done what congress so far has not been able to do. >> i think we ought to give credit to my colleagues in government and really on a bipartisan basis in new york, i think people seized the political moment. it was a galvanizing force and the bill that the governor and senate and assembly passed and i'm now defend
the governor signed new gun-control laws it was a tragic prelude to what was supposed to be a triumphant day for gun limits. the governor signed the bill and afterward said even if washington continues to ignore the please of the people, his state won't. >> i wanted to make sure that -- that again people out there recognize that we were listening, that we do take this very seriously, and we're not trying to create loopholes that could inconvenience or put at risk, law-abiding citizens. >> michael: getting sensible gun safety laws passed simply should not be this hard but today john hickenlooper showed washington how it is done. and then to the very red state of south carolina. mark sanford has gone from the appalachian trail back to the campaign trail, and yesterday he made the transition look pretty easy. he beat a field of 16 candidates, but will have to stand in a runoff race, and things are getting whacky on the democrat side as well. they have elizabeth colbert-busch. this one has a reality show written all over it. joining me now for the robert behre. he's a politi
laws and opponents say it restricts minority voting. that's not all, learning a new report released by the department inspector general, the lawsuit against the new black panther party back in 2008. joining me now to explore more on this possible pick. is syndicated columnist, michelle malkin. welcome back. >> thanks for having me on, sean. >> sean: and the radical people keep getting through and i would expect him to take his ideological comrades. >> this is completely expected of course and i think the ball is now in the court of the republican party to expose just how radical this assistant attorney general is and i've reported extensively on tom perez's history as an extremist, race-baiter, and i think most troubling from my perspective, his long-time advocacy, not of american workers, but of illegal alien workers. this is somebody who cut his teeth at casa de maryland which is one of the most activist open border groups in the country. it's funded by government. millions of dollars from the state of maryland and local governments, as well as the radical left wing billionaire ge
lawmakers to enact new gun laws? facebook.com/carolcnn or tweet me @carolcnn. >>> in missouri, charges expected to be filed today against a man who interrupted kansas city mayor sly james during a speech on tuesday. >> million dollars in investment -- >> this man has just got through talking about exactly [ bleep ] [ bleep ] [ bleep ]. >> that's not okay. affiliate kctv reports the mayor's body guards wrestled the man backstage. mayor james, a former marine, he was not hurt. he called the incident unfortunate. >>> to michigan now where police got quite a shock during a patrol stop. it happened yesterday in c kalama kalamazoo. officers stopped to talk to a man sitting in a parked car. he said he just hit a deer and then picked it up to take it home for food. but when he popped the trunk, the deer hopped out. i guess they'll be calling for takeout now. >> now is your chance to talk back on one of the big stories of the day. the question for you this morning, will the newtown death photos force lawmakers to enact new gun laws? gun control democrats are a frustrated bunch. despite polls sh
dollar it seems that we spend, leave the president's health care law in place, put new regulations on main street. and this is what will get -- what we'll get more of. family will continue to fall further and further behind. families who are looking for a job, who either drop out completely an give up working, or they're forced onto food stamps. families that watched wall street grow wealthier as they gain, what, $10 a month in their paycheck? the republican budget changes the course of not just our financial position of the country, it changes the course of our economy. adding immediately 1% growth, closing that growth gap here in this first year. arding more income, $1,500 to a family. over the next 10 years, doing dramatically more, both for families to come. that's what the republican budget is about, about chaining the growth gap, closing it, giving our families a fighting chance again. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady from new york. ms. ma low mi: i grant seven minutes to a new member of the joint economic committee, john del
is considered in the decision-making process, but it's not an overall factor. so, if the by law officer had determined that that was a nuisance, the property owner would have been forced to remove it, but in this situation made a determination that it wasn't a nuisance, that it was put on, it wasn't detracting from the neighborhood and it was allowed to remain. it gives the officers a lot of leeway. we are looking at what toronto is doing right now in terms of possibly coming up with a way of retroactively approving pieces of art that are on murals that at this point in time our by laws seem to be holding. >> if i could just add to that, actually, because our program is similar [speaker not understood] when we started researching. this idea of graffiti-type murals that have permission like you were showing in your presentation, we don't have those in the city of vancouver. we don't allow that. so, all murals have to go through a permit system. so, any building that wants to put something up, they have to get like a permit from the city. and if the city finds something that they don't like a
of the president's health care law. >> something we're not giving up on. >> same old stuff. >> we're not giving up on destroying the health care system for the american people. >> what? >> we are not giving up o n destroying the health care system for the american people. >> we don't like this law. >> somehow magically maintains savings of obama care. >> please explain that to me. >> it is impossible. >> that doesn't make sense. >> recall if you will campaign 2012. >> $760 billion. >> $716 billion. funneled out of medicare by president obama, we are going to stop it. >> they're not restoring those. >> treating this fake charade like a budget. >> unrealistic. >> uncompromising. >> la la land fantasy. >> like fiction for rand than it is a budget. >>> tonight, president obama had the audacity to suggest that washington's holy grail, a balanced budget, is not actually the holiest thing you can pursue in government. >> paul ryan today put forward his budget. >> right. >> and says he is challenging you to come forward with a budget that reaches balance. are you going to do that? >> no. my goal is not to
in mississippi where the governor is now expected to sign a bill that would plea vent laws forcing -- that would prevent laws forcing restaurants to calorie count. it is called the anti-bloomburg bill. for more let's go to this dog. >> it is like cannibalism or doggism. it is an ism of some kind. mr. president, the president of "red eye." you know that makes you one of the top 20 presidents. you are above estonia. >> i need to do a state of the show speech. i never have done an inaugural address. >> are you doing that the next time you are on, my friend. that is going to be fantastic. we will get beyonce to play. why are cheese-itz okay, but soda isn't? does he not want us to have the stuff he likes? >> i am delighted the judge struck down the large soda ban. it really does go to the heart of what i think is wrong with the country's direction. i hate to maying sugar resoda sound like the future of the country, but this is what obamacare will mean. ultimately the government pays for everything. we don't want to pay for your miss deeds. if you smoke or eat too much, the government can say, you can
to pakistan and egypt, given the national security risks we face as a result of the sharia law imposed upon egypt and the budding terror organizations that our intelligence networks are cracking on a daily basis, the fact we killed one of most notorious leaders in the history of counterterrorism in pakistan. >> neil: would you stop giving money outright? ron paul has always argued, with all the billions of the years we have given to so many countriess to buy their friendship, we want put a deposit down on their lyings and they turn around and hate us, or in the case of the muslim brotherhood in egypt, we give them more money to hope that will make up for the money we have already given them. >> this is just -- it's clearly a -- i'm not -- i still haven't figured out why there's so much thick smoke regarding giving aid to these countries, given the fact they're centrally located in the heart of what continues to be one of our most significant security threats again, which is the fact that you're dealing with specific countries who are allowing the incitement and recruitment of terror organiz
later in the show. >> jamie: new controversy that is erupting over a gun law that goes into effect in new york today. it requires mental health professionals to report the names of patients they think could potentially hurt themselves or others. the federal department of veterans' affairs says it won't comply and senior correspondent eric shawn has the latest. >> reporter: the fact that some won't want to say patients are a threat. that is why they are fighting back against the new law. department of veterans affair they will not comply with the requirement and safe act cited concerns sharing veterans' records and they think is an invasion of privacy. it orders physicians and psychiatrists to report possibly dangerous patients to officials but the v.a. says federal laws safeguarding privacy of records does not require them to comply with the state law. federal law takes precedence over conflicting state and local laws. a democratic new york governor says defends the law and he says it would still be confidential. >> some organizations just say at the beginning of the day on all com
out the country by essentially raiding people's bank accounts. law mickers are set to vote on the plan tomorrow. if passed the government would seize up to 10% of some people's hard-earned savings in order to pay off the mistakes. the plan causing outrage. word of atms running out of cash. people trying to take money out of the bank. now fear of a bank run has the government shutting down all bank until at least thursday or friday. now concerns that other struggling countries could try the same thing and that sent chills through the markets around the world. right now the dow has recovered from the session lows. it was briefly up, and ever so briefly. but now we're down just a little bit. jerry willis is here. this cyprus situation is more than just raiding people's bank accounts. this has to do with people who, it's believed, may have been laundering money through the banks. >> that's right. but it would affect everybody, whether you laundered money or not you might wake up and the government would have its fat hand in your bank account, which i can't imagine anybody thinks positively
that put together the healthcare law and stood by politicians when they said stupid stuff like this. >> we have to pass the bill, so that you can find out what is in it. >> neil: well, never mind the lawyers actually knew what was in it. they wrote it. they just didn't feel telling us all the stuff that was in it. push coverage for preexisting conditions or keeping older kids on your policy. gloss over the bad stuff like thousands of part-time workers probably, well, losing the policies, collateral damage. i.e.d. now, top obama architect of that law admitting the obvious, the healthcare law is messy. you think? nothing he neglected to point out a few years ago when the warning could have come in handy. too late. we're knee-deep now and it's costing us through the nose. premiums going up much more than they said. doctors dropping out of their professions, much more than they feared. fine mess, i'm sure, in the fine print. where i'm equally sure there was a blanket policy for policy that would provide no blanket no, warmth, no protection, guarantee you could keep your doctor or plan. no plan
needed before it can be executed or implemented? you, you cut and in like 18,000 separate law enforcement agencies in the united states. i'm not knowledgeable of how those categories are handled by independent law enforcement entities, what it takes to have those categories added and the information and put in each of these law enforcement jurisdictions. i would have to get back to you. >> i appreciate that. i think the communities -- the communities also would. in terms of training, we have had this discussion about fbi staff training. the train was utilizing stereotypic erroneous information. we brought that to you, and you're telling us, you're looking at, making sure that these things would be eliminated and addressed. since then, i have heard a couple more times that certain regions have been doing that again. i would like an update on that train. in this area. tomade changes to that end my understanding, those changes have been adopted. training meets the appropriate standards. if you have instances that you have heard that is not accurate, i would appreciate knowing it but i have n
to have an end poi. >> if we have more certainty, with regard to our tax laws, and recession -- regulatory policy, and demonstrate that we understand we have to get our debt down, it has to be enforceable, you have to change who is eligible for, what at what age, and what subsidy. neil: i love about dave, he ticks off people on the right and the left, this is a mutually destructive type issue for the right and left. >> assured destruction. neil: thank you. very much david walker. all right if we get in, is it time to get out, what is washington goes 3 with a plan to ramp up spending. some very worried market pros, saying this is a recipe for selling. monica, i think markets have been under the assumption that some cuts are better than no cuts, sequestration is better than nothing, so, if you just pullback, and say we're not going to to squat, in fact we'll do more, spend more that could derail a bill market faster than anything, right? >> it can, derail a bull market, but i think this problem is that washington is behaving like a lot of financial institutions that got themselves and the cu
and demonstrate that this state has an effective alternative to jessica's law. the "the factor" tip of the day. many of us have a hard time sleeping and many americans have severe sleeping disorder most caused by stress. here is the tip. i was going to say watch our competition, but that would be wrong, if you want to go to sleep. here is the tip, take a hot bath, very hot, before you hit the sack. the japanese have mastered this art. it relaxes the entire body and even if it doesn't make you sleep better, the at least you'll be clean. "the factor" tip of the day. and that's it for us tonight. and please check out the fox news factor website different from bill o'reilly.com. spout out from anywhere in the world, oreilly.com, name and town if you wish to opine. the word of the day, do not be lusk. good word, i'm going to bring that back. if you're watching from some exotic place, let us know. we'll read those tomorrow, the exotic mail portion of "the factor," thanks for watching tonight, i'm bill o'reilly. please always remember that the spin stops right here because we're definitely looking ou
is in the business of making law. the supreme court interprets the law. they strike down the law, they strike down the law. the tests in heller with respect to unusual weapons, to other things, i think do not cover -- in other words, they cover an exemption for assault weapons. >> is that true, cynthia? the supreme court ruled in favor of assault weapons ban, as pointed out a few moments ago. >> exactly. >> i guess you can have the right to carry in d.c. which i don't agree with, but you can do it. >> there are absolutely no rights in the bill of rights that are absolute, as sam said earlier, and the assault weapons ban was in effect for a decade. no one said, at least the supreme court didn't say it was unconstitutional. heller has come along since then, but heller does not say all assault weapons must be legal. it says that authorities may, in fact, pass laws restricting gun ownership. >> in fact, that bastion of liberal thinking, justice scalia said that you can't have regulations on guns. i mean, i don't understand what the argument is about. conservative members of the court saying it's okay
the full spectrum of constitutional conservativism, including life and marriage and the rule of law. [applause] on the life question. it is simple. i went through the toughest election of my life last fall. i had cameras around me from st. patrick's day to november 6. they were trying to get a second or a minute to run against me in a single ad. they did not get one second, by the way. of they are in the business try to say i did not back up any issue. we battled against life. is human life sacred in all of its forms? yes, it is. at one moment does life begin? at conception. the people on the other side of this question dare not answer either one of those question, they know they lose the debate. i stood on life and i stood on marriage. [applause] and the thing that a bunch of people are backing away from these challenge don't seem to realize, i'm still standing. [applause] why is that? i did not run a campaign on jobs in the economy, jobs in the economy, and beat that drum until i beat people into sleep. that is part of it but the rest of this has to be added together or we can nev
's law to help the seriously mentally ill we see on the streets. these folks are a danger to themselves and others and we must work with the system and put them on the pact through case management and monitoring. for two years now since i've been mayor we call this initiative for the community and it's working. this is helping people chief greater stability so this year we'll make the san francisco law calls laura's law pertinent. it's about public safety arrest despite a year where we experiences to homicides in our city san francisco remains the safest city at levels not seen since the 1960s. one homicide is too many. last year, i i was frustrated like all of you by the rash the homicides and shootings in this very community and i suggested we need to shack up our efforts for the police and communities to stop this voinsz. i regret the upheaval it started but i don't regret this today. since we launched the ipo we've seen some rules no homicides in august since the last thirty years. and homicides and gun violence down over the first part of the year citywide. thank you
.w. law goes back to 1960 when the state-owned company was privatized. they a-- retained only 22.2% of the shares but the v.w. law inshowers it can still override other partners on vital decisions. that makes the company less attractive other investors. the european court of justification ruled that the law is illegal. >> the perspective of v.w. ice global exeltors is understandable. they see themselves as being subjugated to different regulations. if a company wants to buy up shares as part of a hostile takeover they can do this to company x or y but not to v.w. that gives v.w. a competitive advantage. >> the law's backers say investors still trailed plenty of v.w. shares, as with any other publicly listed company. they say brussels should keep out of v.w.'s corporate affairs. >> in a moment, we'll delve into the endless archives of the former east german secret police. >> first a look at other stories making the news. residents of the falkland islands have voted almost unanimously to remain british. 9 .8% said they wanted to carry on being british overseas territory. the refe
, transportation venues, urs has supported more than 400 of the fortune 500 firms and state, and law law enforcement we have a workforce of over 50,000 individuals and have the much sought after safety act certification. the individuals that we used on the subject matter team and portion of this, they have got a wealth of background, and very indepth, we have phds in there. you have got, structural engineers. pes, hvac, meps, there is a whole range of law enforcement. so we brought a wealth of experience and a lot of people to this particular project. who have good experience with transportation, i should say that all of these individuals have transportation backgrounds as well. >> one of the reasons that urs is in a very good position to look at the transit center is because of our out reach, we have got extraordinary advantage to access and look at threatening information on a daily basis that is due in part to the contracts that we hold. some classified and some open. this access is conducted on a constant basis and we use it to validate the threats so that we know what is going on ev
. they have to know bankruptcy law, state law, property law, tort law, they have tremendous workloads. but they keep this economy going. if you slow that down and civil dispositions, where the damages are going to be paid to someone who is the victim of a breach of contract, if you are potentially going to cause this because of criminal suits due to delayed, then you are threatening the efficiency of the legal structure. .. president clinton who signed down into the recently wrote the question is whether it is consistent with the principles of the nation that on history to, quality and justice above all and is therefore unconstitutional, and quote. in the time that his pastor 1996, my view along with president clinton and colleagues, their face and makeup of our families herbology for what i think is for the better. those of us in congress, regardless for religion or party represents you in and nothing relationships you wish to have rights granted to a sitting on sitting on the podium today. i cannot in good conscience tell my constituents that their country does not value their bond,
earlier this month. but mis-communication between law enforcement agencies led to his release. kron four's philippe djegal explains. >> reporter: less than a half hour after robbing the mechanics bank on pinole valley road fridaym, march first. pinole police arrested gary fite junior for the crime. he and his accomplice were taken into custody. booked into contra costa county jail. by law, law enforcement and the district attorney have to file charges and arraign suspects within three days of an arrest. otherwise, the suspects have to be released from custody. the pinole police chief says his department filed its report to the da's office on the morning of tuesday march fifth. he says the da's office then called later that day and confirmed charges would be filed. yet still, fite was released from custoday. the contra costa county sheriff's department says it had no other choice than to release him. because quote there were no warrants, authority or other charges against fite that would allow us to continue holding him. the da's office could not be reached for comment. now, julie sohn, w
to when you go, yeah, i would never do that or couldn't do that because of the laws in my political jurisdiction or whatever, we are not allowed to do that. then there's going to be other things when you think, gosh, i never thought about that, i think that would work really good. i'm going to take it back it my jurisdiction. probably over the past few years i've got 500 people i've dealt with, officers that have come to the class and subsequently become gravanis experts and set up programs. almost every program is different. a lot of the basis is the same, the information is consistent worldwide but people will tweak what information they are going to use and how they are going to be allowed to operate. some are in plain cars, some in marked units, it all depends how it's going to go. take the information you get, there's so much good information here today and tomorrow, take the information you want, take it back and integrate it into however you are going to work your program. when we come right down to it, it's not important what you know, it's what you can prove in court.
, which by law was due last month. he says it will be out the week of august 8 bid what the senate democrats have done, and these they have produced a budget, first time in four year. have thehe democrats senate and republicans have the house, we will not have a budget that is the result of regular order. there is actually going to be negotiations in each house. i don't think it will be a grand bargain, but you might have some agreement on the edges. >> you have got to hand it to paul ryan, he doesn't quit. he keeps coming back for more. end the summit for consistency and likability and assiduous this, but you cannot say this is a serious bachmann. you cannot say we will repeal obamacare, which will cover un inter people, 26 million, and a decade, and not say what you will replace. money from then repeal of allg obamacare -- he is spending money from the repeal of obamacare that it does not acted it does not exist and cannot exist unless they get control of congress. >> spending money that does not exist, that is nothing new. the oldsides applying gang. republicans know that this i
with the realtor association to make sure that disclosure laws adequately cover this and make sure that people buying and selling these buildings are fully aware of the ordinance requirements and myself and the city staff is here to answer any questions that may come up. thank you. >> thank you, mr. leaney. >> so mr. egan, do you want to present? >> thank you supervisors. control economic developments. our office issued an economic report on this. i will make 3 points about it. first of all, like many forms of legislation it has cost and benefits as the supervisors have mentioned the benefits of this legislation are highly sensitive to the probability of an earthquake. those benefits include future repair cost as has been mentioned for people to be able to stay in their home after an event. certainly improved life safety. these benefits are highly sensitive to earthquake probabilities and based on the numbers from usgs, the most recent numbers we estimate there is about a 2 percent chance of an earthquake and the 2 percent probability alone would justify this immediate spent you sped expendi
calling for the rule of law, something he says china urgently needs today. >> i refused to bow my head in submission, so they hit me again and again. i lay in a pool of my own blood for more than three hours. we must abolish it as soon as possible. the law should protect people's rights. >> for now, life goes on in china's hated like -- hated gulags. tang hui's incarceration has led even china's official media to say that it is time the system was swept into the dustbin of history. >> a time of change in china. finally, from the jungle of the amazon to the concrete jungle of new york. he lives in -- lived in a brazilian village it is so remote it is a five-day boat ride to the nearest town. now, through a fellowship program, he is learning to speak english and make documentaries in the city that never sleeps. as you can imagine, it is quite a shock. >> from a village deep in the amazon to one of the busiest cities in the world. how would you cope with that kind of transition? that brings today's show to a close. you can watch "bbc world news" on your local channel. i am katty kay. than
that protesters have been harassing anyone going into the clinic. the group doesn't believe it's breaking any laws by setting up just outside of the clinic's entrance. there's already a law that requires protesters to stay at least eight feet away from anyone's clients or workers entering a clinic. the group called 40 days for life is a nationwide anti-abortion group but san francisco supervisor david campos says that law, the current law, is not being enforced. >> the effort here is to really strike the right balance between the rights that people have to express themselves and the right balance of people, the right they have to access health care including reproductive health. >> we're not going away. anything that saves lives, saves babies is obviously bad for business because planned parenthood is the big baby killing business so we're here to save lives. >> so instead of current eight-foot rule, campos will introduce legislation to create a 25-foot buffer zone around the planned parenthood facility. >>> the oakland police department is rolling out a new way to fight crime. the department's ch
for this law bass it is a law that i will like to see pass. the current state of soft story building residents an opportunity -- it's not that -- rather that owners even those that have the desires and resources to make-up grades are stuck in a catch 22 with regards to the pressures they are under in the housing mark. without looking to doing an upgrade seriously those that do remain the suckers as a disadvantage to the peers that do not. what management does is take that a way, 25 percent of the land building owners who were notified and required to do an evaluation did a retrofit. doing it now is inevitable. so why should you do exactly what berkeley did? they haven't passed their mandatory second phase retrofit ordinance yet and now they are the suckers again because of failure of government action to follow through. and only government action can signal to tenants that it's worth paying more for a retrofit unit. we need all stake holders in the environment to receive that. >> thank you very much. next speaker? >> good afternoon supervisors, my name is michael wills. i'm an architect and e
it back to one of my administrative law judges who holds a hearing. the whole process probably takes 2-3 months but in the meantime while that process is going forward, the pass through is stayed and the tenant is not obld obligated to pay. >> it takes 2-3 months to pass this? >> more or less. we have an incentive to expedited this. it would be after a lot of postponement because they are ill or something like that. usually what i do is try and call the other side. call the landlord and say could you please extend this pass through and usually they are cooperative. >> how long would you know this -- how well-known do you think this application is amongst renters? >> we think it's quite well-known because anytime we send a decision that contains a pass through. we send out a memorandum you mean in three languages that refer tenants to organizations to do actual outreach around hardship applications. i will admit, it's not pleasant. tenants, there is no privacy involved. once you say i cannot afford to pay a pass through that the landlord is required to. you have to prove that it you ha
, and law enforcement for numbers. it was more of a community. i did not go to school and meet somebody. i lived on this block and this is where my grandmother's house was, or i was born and raised. what people may see on tv was at my front door. the killing and the dope dealing. it was right there. this was a community list of people, we just grew up together. there were no handouts and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother was. they became my enemies. it w
acts of violence. the afternoon's panel will have a debate about a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and th
of law. [applause] and on the life question, it's really pretty simple. i went through the toughest election of my life last fall. i had tracking cameras around me from st. patrick's day until november 6th, one to three cameras always focused on me trying to get a second or a minute that they could run against me in an ad. they didn't get a single second that they could run against me, not one second, by the way. [applause] but they're in the business of trying to undermine and weaken us, and i didn't back up on any principle. we debated the issue of life, and i said my opponent, my leftist opponent cannot answer two questions on life. is human life sacred in all of its forms? yes, it is. and at what moment does life begin? the instant of conception. and the people on the other side of this question dare not answer either one of those questions. they know they lose the debate. i stood on life, and i stood on marriage -- [applause] and the thing that a bunch of people that have been backing away from these challenges don't seem to realize that i'm still standing. [applause] now, why
deported. >> we were talking about the law and it is to the fair. >> this fourth grade class at jefferson elementary is learning a very personal lesson on immigration law. >> we thought the law was supposed to protect us and help us go to school, but look what happened to rodrigo. please help us bring him back. >> they lobbied the city council to pass a resolution to send to congress in support of bringing home their classmate, 10-year-old rodrigo. their visas expired while visiting family in mexico. on january 10th, the u.s. customs officers denied their re-entry and sent them back to mexico with a five-year wait to reapply for new visas. >> what about rodrigo? who is fighting for rodrigo? we need to fight for rodrigo's rights. >> in the first berkeley council skype session, rodrigo joined his classmates. >> thank you, everyone, for what you are doing to try and get me home. >> the students wrote letters to their congressional representatives and the president asking for a waiver called humanitarian parole. >> we are just fourth grade kids, but you are doing a big thing. thank you. >> th
the law and it is to the fair. >> this fourth grade class at jefferson elementary is learning a very personal lesson on immigration law. >> we thought the law was supposed to protect us and help us go to school, but look what happened to rodrigo. please help us bring him back. >> they lobbied the city council to pass a resolution to send to congress in support of bringing home their classmate, 10-year-old rodrigo. their visas expired while visiting family in mexico. on january 10th, the u.s. customs officers denied their re-entry and sent them back to mexico with a five-year wait to reapply for new visas. >> what about rodrigo? who is fighting for rodrigo? we need to fight for rodrigo's rights. >> in the first berkeley council skypeession, session, joined h joined his classmates. >> thank you, everyone, for what you are doing to try and get me home. >> the students wrote letters to their congressional representatives and the president asking for a waiver called humanitarian parole. >> we are just fourth grade kids, but you are doing a big thing. thank you. >> the resolution passed, b
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